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Upskilling Courses Accelerated Option

Upskilling Courses for the Changing Workforce

If you are looking to build your expertise or explore something new as you pursue your careers goals, our large selection of upskilling courses can help. These courses can be taken individually and do not require enrollment in a degree program, but can be applied for credit in the future if you decide to pursue a certificate or degree. Individual courses are the perfect introduction to online learning and professional skill-building.

Top Reasons to Upskill

In the professional world, skills and talents are your currency. Therefore, expanding your skillset - as often as possible - can be an excellent path to success. Whether you’re brand new to the workforce, looking to switch career paths, or just wanting to advance in your current role, upskilling is a great investment in developing your skills.

 

 

Invest in Your Career Future

  • Future-proof your career
  • Increase your value to your organization
  • Stay current in your chosen field
  • Explore something new and interesting
  • Build your professional network
  • Open yourself up to new opportunities
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Explore Courses

Champlain College Online offers a variety of courses for you to choose from, in five areas of study. We do allow students to take most of our courses without being enrolled in a degree or certificate program, but some may have prerequisite courses you need to complete first. All the courses listed here are available for you to take, no prerequisites required. 

Business/Accounting/Healthcare Courses

Finding and utilizing the right data and information to help with business decision-making - this skill is indispensable to any business professional, no matter the field or discipline of business. Students learn how to find data - the right data - efficiently and accurately, using advanced search methods. Students will harness major resources and utilize databases, government resources, and financial websites. Students will also learn to utilize a system for developing research questions, choosing the right resources to substantiate a research plan and evaluate and organize business data into useful forms.

All businesses have information systems, and the vast majority of them are computerized. Students will study the development and use of information systems to achieve organizational goals. From a management perspective, students will learn how information systems enhance buisness processes, how to use information systems as a competitive advantage and their usefulness in integrating across organizations. Other topics include IS security, ethical issues surrounding information systems and the consequences of its international reach.

Provides an overview of the entire legal system, with an emphasis on contract rights. Discusses the essential elements of a contract, the breach of contracts and the remedies for breach. Presents business and consumer laws, including white-collar crime, landlord-tenant rights, real property interests and administrative law.

As business environments become more complex, the accompanying dilemmas require a more advanced problem-solving process. Students are introduced to methodology for analyzing data and applying appropriate techniques for unconventional and creative solutions. They will learn how to systematically analyze a problem, generate innovative and provocative ideas for solutions, make choices among those ideas, and evaluate the results.

Accounting is the language of business. This course introduces the student to accounting from the point of view of the user of financial reports and is appropriate for personal as well as business applications. Students explore the impact of transactions on the financial position and profitability of a business, and analyze financial reports of real-world corporations.

Project Management is the formal application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project-based activities to meet organizational requirements. Project management is accomplished through the use of processes such as Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. Project managers can divide projects into these phases to provide better management control with appropriate links to the ongoing operations of the organization. Collectively, these phases, known as the project life cycle, form the foundation for the practice of project management and are guided by the Body of Knowledge from the Project Management Institute (PMI).

Business analytics and data visualization transform data into business insights to allow for better decision-making. This course utilizes a combination of existing datasets and common analytics tools to teach new and emerging managers, without backgrounds in data science, how to evaluate data, consider available options, and present a graphical representation of data outcomes for decision-makers.

Understanding financial statements and how to interpret them is important to all those working in businesses. In this course students learn the relationship among financial statements; study how to interpret this information and to apply this understanding in real-world contexts; and learn how to use financial information to help make sound management decisions.

Companies must effectively and efficiently deliver goods or services to fulfill customer demands. MGMT 315 will examine various inventory management methods and processes, from traditional just-in-case to more progressive just-in-time techniques. The course will investigate the constraints placed on the inventory manager by the business and the supply chain itself, including accounting options/effects, metrics, logistics options and seasonality. A review of emerging technologies in the supply chain will also be covered to provide a comprehensive introduction to the growing field of supply chain management.

The perspectives, beliefs, and preferences of employees in today's workplace are more diverse than perhaps ever before. Today's high-performing managers are those who foster inclusive, positive, and responsive organizational cultures for their people. But with such varied perspectives, what cultural considerations make the most sense for an organization? Management in the 21st Century will teach students how to foster a workplace environment where people can flourish and are motivated to meet objectives and ambitions for the organization.

There are two ways to view behavior in organizations: cultural/interpretive and technical/rational. Students will explore both views, how they explain and predict organizational behavior and the management approaches they inform. Within these contexts, students will explore team and individual behaviors, ethical and diversity issues in the workplace, and how to foster success in the face of significant change. Students will apply course concepts to real-world scenarios and their personal experiences.

Students gain a systematic overview of the U.S. health care system, including the role of the public and private sectors. Federal and state health policy and legislation are examined in depth. Students develop an understanding of the complex social and environmental issues that are driving the need for quality improvement, performance measurement and the use of information systems. They become familiar with the various mechanisms through which health services are delivered and also compare the U.S. health care system to other systems outside the U.S.

At the very base, businesses organize resources to earn a return on investments. Students are introduced to this concept from a process-based and integrative perspective; i.e. understanding how assets and people come together to accomplish their goal. They also learn about factors that can impact a business's success including socially responsible factors, globalization, innovative thinking and technology. Students use current articles and discussions to develop informed opinions about the place of their organizations and their leaders in the global economy.

Principles of Economics introduces the fundamental concepts of economics - the study of how people manage resources, and how they react to scarcity. This course focuses on both microeconomics (the behavior of consumers and companies) and macroeconomics (large-scale economic factors such as employment and interest rates), so that you'll gain a broad understanding of how a modern market economy functions, how decisions in business settings are informed by economics, and how economics applies to your everyday life.

Students identify and analyze the myriad legal issues surrounding the workplace, employment relationships, human resources, and federal and state regulation of employment. Topics include employment discrimination, wrongful discharge, health and retirement benefits, occupational health and safety, competition and trade secret agreements, sexual harassment, and privacy rights.

Design/Marketing Courses

Here is your opportunity to bring your communication ideas to life. You will learn how to plan, design, typeset, produce artwork, proof, and manage production for brochures, posters, and other communication collateral materials. You will learn the basic language of design and the overall production process-all to help you produce these projects yourself or work with design and production professionals to produce complex projects. Some basic art supplies will be required.

Today's high-quality digital images are as much art as they are science. In this course, students learn to use Adobe Photoshop to prepare and create images for web use. Hands-on activities develop familiarity with tools like eyedropper and quick mask, but also challenge students to create vector shapes and incorporate typography into the design of an ebook cover. Students also must create an email campaign and redesign a web site to specifications.

Marketing is the process that moves goods/services from concept through customer, while considering the customer's needs and satisfaction. Students learn marketing terminology and principles including the marketing mix (product, price, place and promotion) and the Four C's (create,connect,change and cancel). Marketing knowledge is reinforced through application, and students have an opportunity to integrate these principles with managerial accounting concepts. The impact of ethical issues, diversity, globalization and social responsibility on marketing decisions will also be examined.

This course will introduce you to the fundamental language of visual form and basic skills on the Macintosh operating system, including the industry-standard software applications used to create, acquire, and manipulate digital images. You will learn about two-dimensional design, color theory and terminology, and will apply these principles to a variety of basic design projects. Color, form and meaning will be explored as well in terms of cultural, psychological, physiological, and historical aspects

This class is designed to provide students who have little or no digital video production knowledge with an introduction to methods and strategies for production of digital video stories. Using the art of telling a story, the class will create educational, informational or personal experience video productions utilizing audio, video, scriptwriting and digital editing techniques. The class will be focused around hands-on projects, critiques and editing on nonlinear workstations.

IT/Cybersecurity Courses

Use Windows? Want to know more about Linux and or Apple? In this course, students don't just read about other operating systems, they step out of their comfort zones and develop a working knowledge of their structure and functionality. As part of these activities, students also learn how to use VMware and, in the case of students without access to Apple hardware, resources offered in the cloud as a services. Students also survey/compare mobile device operating systems.

This course provides students with an understanding of the many different devices and technologies, from historical to emerging, that are required to design and build networks. In a broad survey of concepts and terminology, students will learn about topology, communications, protocols, and security, and to diagram basic networks to specification.

Security is everyone's problem. The Internet is full of attackers who are looking to steal your information or get control over your system. This is a problem for individuals and businesses so it's essential that even casual users understand enough of how the Internet is put together to be able to understand the threats they face. Students will learn how businesses communicate via the internet and how that exposes them to some of the fundamental attack types. Students will learn how to protect themselves from those attacks.

From storyboard to form creation, students walk through the steps to create a basic four to five-page website to specification in this course that introduces HTML5 and CSS. Hands-on assignments reinforce skills development and best practices in design: navigation, column layout, image editing and usage, fonts and tables.

Math Courses

Mathematical reasoning, when applied to everyday and professional lives, has two dimensions: logic for deterministic situations and probabilities for non-deterministic situations. This course aims to help students develop these mathematical reasoning skills.

Accurate and appropriate visual data representation is increasingly critical in today's work environments. Students will develop skills in data organization, manipulation and interpretation in a way that supports data-driven decision-making and effective communication of numerical data

How to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret data in order to make decisions about the world. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, discrete probability distributions, normal probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing with one sample, hypothesis testing with two samples, correlation, regression, chi square tests, and analysis of variance.

Human Behavior & Thought

Students will learn how to create conditions for successful conflict engagement, a necessary skill for any professional. The course focuses on the foundational capacities to remain calm and connected with oneself and others. In this state students can access helpful ideas and responses and be their best selves regardless of environment. Improving facility for conflict creates stronger relationships and reduces fear. By the end of the course, students will understand that disagreement and difference can become a source of personal and interpersonal growth.

This course draws on fundamental concepts of contemporary communication research to help students identify and develop strategies to become effective and versatile communicators across media and settings. Students will examine and respond to a range of interpersonal situations through the critical evaluation of the three essential components of all communication: its purpose, audience, and context. Students will leave the course with the ability to reflect on and adapt their strategies to successfully and consistently communicate for a range of purposes across diverse settings.

This course will introduce students to major streams of social justice thought, including historical social justice movements, theoretical problems having to do with social equality, personal freedom, marginalization, and stigmatization, and the ways in which civic and professional communities respond to these issues.

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts needed to communicate effectively in writing for academic study and professional development. Students will learn how to use the four stages of the writing process--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--to create written communication that meets its intended purpose for its intended audience. Students will also be introduced to rhetorical modes and their role in the development of written communication. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

To take an individual course, or courses, at Champlain College Online as a non-matriculating student complete a few steps:

  • Go to apply.champlain.edu and create an account
  • Select "Non-Degree" and complete a brief form, include your resumé
  • Indicate which course(s) you wish to enroll in
  • A Champlain College Online advisor will contact you within 2 business days. 

Register Now

Upcoming Webinars

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The Online Learning Experience Information Session

Are you curious about online education? Have you taken online classes before, but want to see what online learning is like at Champlain College? Join us for an informational webinar with an admissions representative, who will show you what that experience is like! You'll get a tour of the online classroom, learn about who we are, who are students are, and discover resources and support. The webinar will conclude with a question and answer session.

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Learn More About Upskilling With Champlain College Online

Contact our admissions advisors to learn more about upskilling at Champlain College Online. 

When completing the form, select undecided for academic level. In the message box, indicate which course you are interested in taking and any questions you have. An advisor will contact you within two business days. 

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