Adult female student in cafe working on her tablet

Integrated Studies Online Bachelor’s Degree Program

Format

100% Online

24/7 Access to Coursework

Tuition

$328/credit

$984 3-credit course

Active Duty Military

truED Preferred Tuition

Credit Hours Required

Classes Start

Jan. 9, 2023

Explore Integrated Studies

Take the next step in your career through an individualized, expedited course of study. Designed to help adult students maximize transfer credit opportunities and reach completion quickly, Champlain's online integrated studies bachelor's degree is your chance to customize a degree based on your professional experiences and educational background. This degree is ideal for those who have significant prior academic experience and professional training in a particular area, and want to leverage these experiences in pursuit of a degree.

 

Build Your Career Future

Increasing numbers of jobs - across all industries - now require a minimum of a bachelor's degree for hiring. Our integrated studies degree helps you gain the competencies today's employers are looking for, with an emphasis on key business and soft skills (such as critical thinking and communication) that are applicable to a variety of fields, and that you can carry through your career. You'll also be able to differentiate your degree through a focused area of specialization based on your previous academic and professional experience.

Prospective students interested in the BS in Integrated Studies online program must have completed 40 credits (between prior college experience; alternative credit providers, such as Study.com; NCCRS and ACE-evaluated training; and other certifications Champlain evaluates for college credit) in a "focus area" prior to attending Champlain.

Examples of past focus areas include, but are not limited to: 

  • Business management
  • Criminal justice
  • Emergency management 
  • Fire and rescue studies 
  • Military studies
  • Paralegal studies
  • Technology management 

Fast Start Formula Career Offerings

Increasing your career mobility is at the center of everything we do. As an online bachelor's degree student, you get free access to the Fast Start Formula Career Bundle for getting noticed and getting hired, taught by Jen Morris, a leading executive career coach that partners with us to support our students in their job search journeys. 

Take the next step

Academic Excellence and Recognition

New England Commission of Higher Education Logo

Regionally accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education

US News & World Report Best Online Bachelor's Degree Programs

Ranked among the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs by U.S. News & World Report

Military Friendly School Badge

Designated as a Military Friendly School for our commitment to the military community

Ranked amount the best online colleges by Intelligent.com

Named the Best Private Online College by Intelligent.com

What Can You Do With A Degree In Integrated Studies?

Business and financial occupations are expected to grow 8% from 2020 to 2030 faster than the average growth for all fields, as a result of an increasingly complex global business landscape. The median annual wage for these roles is $72,250.*

In our online integrated studies degree program, you will create a focus area that is tailored to your academic background and professional experiences, and will gain the competencies today's employers are looking for. This degree will prepare you for a variety of career paths in the business world, including human resources, business management, information technology, administrative services, operations, and sales.

*Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 2020; job titles: Study.com, 2020

Top Jobs for Bachelor's in Integrated Studies Graduates

  • Accountant
  • Business Development Specialist
  • Financial Analyst
  • Information Technology Specialist
  • Management Consultant
  • Office Manager
  • Operations Manager
  • Sales Representative
General studies online bachelor's degree graduate presenting work to colleague

Program Details

Learn more about Champlain's 100% online integrated studies bachelor's degree, designed for working professionals.

Champlain's online integrated studies courses encompass the top skills needed by today's business professionals. Graduates of the program are required to complete the following courses.

Area of Study (from prior college experience. 40 credits required) 

Professional Courses (18 credits):

General Education Courses (30 credits)

Science Literacy (3 credits)

Human Thought & Creative Expression (6 credits)

Human Behavior & Social Institutions (3 credits)

General Electives (20 credits)

Professional Courses (18 Credits):

Students will learn about the application of positive individual and group strengths and capacities that can be recognized, evaluated, and expanded to advance organizational well-being. This course encourages students to apply positive organizational behavior processes to everyday challenges organizations face to drive positive workplace behaviors and outcomes. This course also helps students to practice and gain skills, knowledge, and competencies to become positive and impactful leaders and change-makers from whatever position they hold.

Understanding financial statements and how to interpret them is important to all those working in businesses. In this course students learn the relationship among financial statements; study how to interpret this information and to apply this understanding in real-world contexts; and learn how to use financial information to help make sound management decisions.

Students will apply communication theory and research to address the particular challenges to communicating effectively in organizations. Students will learn how to identify organizational communication problems, analyze those problems, and generate effective solutions. Students will examine the relationship between organizational structure and specific communicative practices, and how communication practices by organizational members establish, maintain, or change organizational culture. They will also learn how to anticipate communication deficiencies in organizations, and use communication as a means to facilitate organizational development and innovation.

Prerequisites

Complete COMM-130 or COM-100.

Provides an overview of the entire legal system, with an emphasis on contract rights. Discusses the essential elements of a contract, the breach of contracts and the remedies for breach. Presents business and consumer laws, including white-collar crime, landlord-tenant rights, real property interests and administrative law.

Choose One

Project Management is the formal application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project-based activities to meet organizational requirements. Project management is accomplished through the use of processes such as Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. Project managers can divide projects into these phases to provide better management control with appropriate links to the ongoing operations of the organization. Collectively, these phases, known as the project life cycle, form the foundation for the practice of project management and are guided by the Body of Knowledge from the Project Management Institute (PMI).

Project schedules allow managers, team members, and stakeholders to track progress, set and manage expectations, communicate, control costs, and collaborate. Tasks and deliverables can be monitored and controlled to ensure timely delivery-and if any delays do occur, project managers can easily gauge their impact and make the necessary adjustments. Central to the schedule is a detailed understanding of the project budget, and working to control costs and manage stakeholder expectations.

Prerequisites

Take MGMT-260

Choose One

Discusses the nature and method of economics with emphasis on microeconomic theory. Focus is on demand, supply, market equilibrium, elasticity, costs of production and resource pricing. Examines the market structures of pure competition, oligopoly and monopoly.

A general survey course that covers theories and applications of macroeconomics. Business firms, international economics, labor and government are included. Also examines monetary policy, taxes, public finances, economic output and growth, and international trade in the world economy.

General Education Courses (30 Credits):

This course draws on fundamental concepts of contemporary communication research to help students identify and develop strategies to become effective and versatile communicators across media and settings. Students will examine and respond to a range of interpersonal situations through the critical evaluation of the three essential components of all communication: its purpose, audience, and context. Students will leave the course with the ability to reflect on and adapt their strategies to successfully and consistently communicate for a range of purposes across diverse settings.

This course draws on fundamental concepts of contemporary group communication research to help students identify and develop strategies to communicate effectively in small groups and teams for the cooperative purpose of advancing common goals. Students will draw on listening and responding strategies learned in COMM-130 Interpersonal Communication and apply them to communicating as a leader or member of a small group. They will also learn how to recognize and manage the types of conflicts that can arise in small groups. Prerequisite: COMM-130 Interpersonal Communication

Prerequisites

Complete COMM-130

Students will learn to navigate the rapidly changing nature of communication in the digital age, exploring electronically-mediated communication platforms, social networks, and online social media, while applying specific communication theories in order to determine best practices. Through reading, discussion, and assignments, students will work to overcome online communication barriers and gain a critical understanding of which tools are effective in which situations.

Prerequisites

Take COMM-130 Interpersonal Communication

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts needed to communicate effectively in writing for academic study and professional development. Students will be introduced to rhetorical modes and their role in the development of written communication. Students will also learn how to use the four stages of the writing process--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--to create written communication that meets its intended purpose for its intended audience. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

This course builds on students' proficiency in the writing process and rhetorical modes to introduce the use of sources in written communication. Students will practice information literacy as they learn to determine information needs from sources, identify types of information resources, develop effective search strategies, and incorporate sources in written communication, legally and ethically. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

Prerequisites

Complete ENGL-100 with a minimum grade of C or better

Mathematical reasoning, when applied to everyday and professional lives, has two dimensions: logic for deterministic situations and probabilities for non-deterministic situations. This course aims to help students develop these mathematical reasoning skills.

Accurate and appropriate visual data representation is increasingly critical in today's work environments. Students will develop skills in data organization, manipulation and interpretation in a way that supports data-driven decision-making and effective communication of numerical data

Choose One:

This course builds on students' proficiency in using evidence from sources to support their own prior knowledge to using evidence from sources to develop persuasive communication for a range of purposes, including solving problems and pursuing opportunities in the workplace, in addition to academic study. Students will learn to articulate effective inquiry questions, recognize errors in logic, interpret the validity of persuasive communication created by others, and develop effective persuasive communication of their own using evidence from sources. The role of accurate citation of sources in persuasive communication will also be addressed. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL-100 The Writing Process & ENGL-110 Introduction to Using Evidence from Sources in Writing.

Prerequisites

Complete ENGL-100 and ENGL-110 with a minimum grade of C.

In this course, adult students demonstrate skills and knowledge from work and other life experiences in order to request credit for a specified degree requirement. Students use the conceptual framework of argumentation to make a logical case for credit in an e-portfolio. The portfolio will identify the context for the student's learning in the subject matter, trace its progression over time, and explain how the learning is equivalent to the specified CCO degree requirement. The student will then demonstrate proficiency in each course learning outcome and integrate the learning outcomes in a relevant case study. To achieve a course pass, the completed portfolio must demonstrate course outcome proficiency according to the framework and criteria described above. Portfolios meeting these criteria will be submitted to a faculty subject matter expert for evaluation.

Prerequisites

Full admission into a CCO degree program, ENGL 111, ENGL 112, and approved PLA plan. Students within 12 credits of degree completion are not eligible to take CRIT 200.

Choose One:

Specific application of common tools for writing in the working world. Students will be instructed in rhetorical strategies of professional writing including style, report formats, editing, document design, and integration of visual aids. Students will complete a semester-long writing project; oral and written reports associated with the process of problem-solving within the project will be included.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of technical writing (clear, concise, and targeted)that are common among seven forms of technical communication: email correspondence, editing,employment communication, proposals, long, formal reports,oral communication, and inventions. Through peer reviews and writing workshops, students develop the ability to write and edit text that precisely targets its audience. This course emphasizes deepening and broadening students' writing, speaking, and thinking abilities in a non-lecture-based, hands-on, discussion-centered classroom.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Science Literacy Course (3 Credits):

Students will develop the ability to apply scientific methods to understand the natural world, to identify scientific aspects of daily life, and to evaluate the quality of scientific information based on its source and the methods used for its generation.

Choose Two Human Thought & Creative Expression Courses (6 Credits):

With pressure and release, a window opens and closes, recording light on a sensor. The simple action captures the instinct, judgement, and skill of the person behind the lens. This class will begin a study of the art and craft of photography. Students will develop their vision and their understanding of how to achieve it. Solid skills will be learned and many doors will be opened.

A survey of the continuing change experienced in art since the 15th century. Students will examine how an image is achieved as well as the significance of the subject represented. Individual inquiry concerning the nature of art is encouraged.

Students learn to appreciate films through the critical analysis of various elements of mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound. The course introduces the conventions of classical Hollywood cinema, considers the work of one major director (auteur), and surveys selected international and independent films. Students view and discuss films each week.

Students in the course will explore the cultural history of the music genre broadly referred to as rock. Students will explore the social, economic and political contexts that are influenced by and that influenced each style in the United States. By listening, watching, reflecting upon, discussing and writing, students will explore how music takes on meaning, personally, and culturally. Topics and themes include the relationships between and among gospel, country, funk, folk, disco, rap and hip hop; the role of business and technology in those relationships, and political or transgressive elements of rock music.

Students will apply communication theory and research to address the particular challenges to communicating effectively in organizations. Students will learn how to identify organizational communication problems, analyze those problems, and generate effective solutions. Students will examine the relationship between organizational structure and specific communicative practices, and how communication practices by organizational members establish, maintain, or change organizational culture. They will also learn how to anticipate communication deficiencies in organizations, and use communication as a means to facilitate organizational development and innovation.

Prerequisites

Complete COMM-130 or COM-100.

Students will learn how to create conditions for successful conflict engagement, a necessary skill for any professional. The course focuses on the foundational capacities to remain calm and connected with oneself and others. In this state students can access helpful ideas and responses and be their best selves regardless of environment. Improving facility for conflict creates stronger relationships and reduces fear. By the end of the course, students will understand that disagreement and difference can become a source of personal and interpersonal growth.

Specific application of common tools for writing in the working world. Students will be instructed in rhetorical strategies of professional writing including style, report formats, editing, document design, and integration of visual aids. Students will complete a semester-long writing project; oral and written reports associated with the process of problem-solving within the project will be included.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Students will study important themes in the social history of the United States since the Civil War. This course allows students to expand their critical thinking skills through an examination of primary and secondary sources. Themes might include: the evolving status of women; the immigrant experience; the concept of the American dream; the paradox of freedom vs. slavery; the minority experience; the tensions between social classes. Students will be evaluated primarily on writing assignments.

Students will become familiar with arguments originating from the following schools of ethics: virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism. Students will apply these ethical schools of thought to formulate arguments, practice deliberation and assess the implications of their decisions for various stakeholders in a professional context.

Prerequisites

Must have 75 completed credits or permission of Program Director.

This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of technical writing (clear, concise, and targeted)that are common among seven forms of technical communication: email correspondence, editing,employment communication, proposals, long, formal reports,oral communication, and inventions. Through peer reviews and writing workshops, students develop the ability to write and edit text that precisely targets its audience. This course emphasizes deepening and broadening students' writing, speaking, and thinking abilities in a non-lecture-based, hands-on, discussion-centered classroom.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Choose One Human Behavior & Social Institutions Course (3 Credits):

A survey of the science of psychology, including an overview of human behavior in various areas such as physiopsychology, development, learning social psychology, personality and abnormal behavior.

A study of human groups, culture, the self, and human interaction. The course focuses on contemporary American society and the influence of culture on our actions and beliefs, with the goal of fostering critical thinking about our social environment.

Provides a comprehensive analysis of the fundamentals of substantive criminal law. Students will learn the essential elements of crimes and the rationale underlying criminal law. The nature of jurisdiction, the criminal act, the criminal state of mind and matters affecting responsibility for criminal conduct are included.

This course focuses on the rules and procedures governing how the American criminal justice system must process individuals suspected, accused, and convicted of law violations.

This course provides students with a broad overview of the history, theory, and fundamentals of criminal investigation. Students are introduced to the basic responsibilities of investigators and protocols for report writing, evidence collection, and preparation of cases for trial. They also learn specific investigative techniques for different types of crimes, such as crimes involving violence and property, terrorism, and hate crimes, and, where appropriate, compare investigative protocols from other legal cultures.

Prerequisites

Take CRIM-120, CRIM-121.

Discusses the nature and method of economics with emphasis on microeconomic theory. Focus is on demand, supply, market equilibrium, elasticity, costs of production and resource pricing. Examines the market structures of pure competition, oligopoly and monopoly.

A general survey course that covers theories and applications of macroeconomics. Business firms, international economics, labor and government are included. Also examines monetary policy, taxes, public finances, economic output and growth, and international trade in the world economy.

Principles of Economics introduces the fundamental concepts of economics - the study of how people manage resources, and how they react to scarcity. This course focuses on both microeconomics (the behavior of consumers and companies) and macroeconomics (large-scale economic factors such as employment and interest rates), so that you'll gain a broad understanding of how a modern market economy functions, how decisions in business settings are informed by economics, and how economics applies to your everyday life.

Graduates of the integrated studies bachelor's online program will demonstrate the following skills, knowledge, and competencies:

  • Manage and Interpret interactions with fellow organization members.
  • Diagnose learning needs and formulate goals and strategies to seek knowledge from multiple sources.
  • Prioritize and set goals based on objectives and the availability of limited resources.
  • Apply fundamental financial concepts to interpret an organization's economic performance.
  • Examine basic contracts for appropriate content.
  • Apply the concepts of supply and demand, markets and pricing to an organization.
  • Examine basic contracts for appropriate content.
  • Apply the concepts of supply and demand, markets and pricing to an organization.
  • Evaluate and integrate a variety of material to create unique perspectives.
  • Systematically analyze available information to produce data-driven responses to problems.
  • Explore the ethical aspects of a decision to create sensitivity to the relevant issues and weight the considerations that might impact our choice of course of action.

Champlain College Online's integrated studies faculty, led by Assistant Dean of Curriculum & Assessment Elizabeth Gauffreau, M.A., are expert practitioners in the field. Their industry expertise ensures that our curriculum is aligned with the needs of employers, and reflects the skills today’s business professionals need for success. Classes led by our seasoned experts will give you real-world insight into the business world, and create a rich community of career-focused learning.

Alumni of the Champlain College Online bachelor's in integrated studies program work in corporations, small businesses, government organizations, and nonprofits nationwide, including:

  • AT&T 
  • Cisco Systems 
  • Dealer.com
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
  • Department of the Navy
  • Department of Veteran's Affairs
  • GE Healthcare
  • Global Foundries
  • Keurig Dr. Pepper
  • Office of Personnel Management (OPM)
  • People's United Bank 
  • New England Federal Credit Union 
  • Social Security Administration
  • Sophos
  • Springfield Police Department 
  • State of Vermont
  • St. Luke's Hospital 
  • University of Vermont Medical Center 
  • U.S. Army
  • U.S. Postal Service
  • Vermont Air National Guard 

 

Titles our alumni hold include:

  • Account Manager
  • Advertising Sales Consultant 
  • Analyst
  • Associate Manager, Corporate Security
  • Biomedical Equipment Support Specialist
  • Chief of Police
  • Claims Technical Expert
  • Contract Compliance Manager
  • Data Analyst
  • Engineering Technician
  • Financial Manager
  • Health Technician
  • HR/Payroll Specialist 
  • Insurance Agent
  • IT Specialist
  • Medical Operations NCO
  • Mortgage Sales Consultant 
  • Program Assistant
  • Regional Coordinator
  • Registrar
  • Senior Software Quality Assurance Manager

Tuition & Costs

Online Undergraduate Tuition Fall '22 - Summer '23

$328 Per Credit
$984* Per Course
$250 Per Credit for Military Service Members (family members see truED Tuition)
$150 One-Time Graduation Fee

*Based on a 3-credit course; cost will vary if course is a different number of credits

Dare to Expect More of Champlain Online

Expect Convenience

Our programs are designed for busy adults. Go to school wherever and whenever is best for you, on the device of your choice.

Expect A Career Focus

Everything you learn in our online classrooms is relevant and immediately applicable to your work.

Expect Support

Your education journey is our priority and our student support team has your back every step of the way.

Expect Superior Faculty

Learn from practitioner faculty working in the field, with real-world experience and knowledge.

Meet the Program Director

Janet Morrison, Program Director for Integrated Studies and General Education

Janet Morrison

Ph.D.
Academic Program Director, General Education
  • BS, Integrated Studies
  • General Education Curriculum

About

Dr. Morrison has been with Champlain College since 2002, first as faculty; since 2013 as an Academic Advisor, and then as the Associate Director of Academic Advising. While in the Academic Advisor role, she also developed the role of student success coach, and contributed to the development of Champlain College Online's two orientation courses for new students: Introduction to Online Learning; and Introduction to Academic Integrity.

Her dedication to teaching excellence and students' lived experience in their classes began in graduate school at the University of Maine (M.A., Speech Communication), and Southern Illinois University (Ph.D., Speech Communication) and continued through several academic roles prior to continuing her career at Champlain College Online.

Why Champlain

Kari Trudo, Bachelor's Degree in Integrated Studies

Affordability

"With Champlain's transfer credit policy, I was able to apply much of the education I had already received toward my bachelor's degree, making it much more affordable. I feel like the value I received from the program way outweighed the price I paid for it."

Kari Trudo Bachelor's Degree in Integrated Studies
Teacher, Green Mountain Montessori School

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