Online computer and information systems graduate in front of large server at work

Computer & Information Systems Online Bachelor’s Degree Program

Format

100% Online

24/7 Access to Coursework

Semester Schedule

Two 7-Week Terms Per Semester

Three Semesters Per Year

Credit Hours Required

120

Time Commitment

10-17 hours per course per week*

*Part-time and full-time enrollment options available Cost

Cost per Credit

$318

$250 Active Duty Military

Fees

Fast & Free Application

$150 Graduation Fee

*Demonstrate competencies to reduce your number of required courses Important Dates

Apply By

Sept. 25, 2020

Classes Start

Oct. 26, 2020

Upcoming Program Webinar

Upcoming General Webinar

Explore Computer & Information Systems

Organizations are increasingly reliant on technology, and require highly trained professionals to help them manage their computer and information systems. Designed for working adults, and with an emphasis on hands-on learning, Champlain's bachelor's degree in computer information systems will give you an education in both the latest technologies and the interpersonal skills required in a CIS professional, preparing you for success in this in-demand field.

Build Your Career Future

Differentiate yourself with a computer and information systems degree that equips you with a foundation of both key technical skills (including knowledge of 12+ key applications, platforms, and programming languages, listed below) and important soft skills like critical thinking, problem solving, and communication that you can carry through your career. You'll also gain subject matter expertise through a certificate in a specialization of your choice. You'll emerge from the program with a well-rounded skillset that will allow you to tackle both current and emerging information system challenges.

Academic Excellence and Recognition

New England Commission of Higher Education Logo

Regionally accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education

US News & World Report Best Online Programs Bachelor's Badge 2020

Ranked among the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs by U.S. News & World Report

Military Friendly School Badge

Designated as a Military Friendly School for our commitment to the military community

Ranked amount the best online colleges by Intelligent.com

Named the Best Private Online College by Intelligent.com

What Can You Do With A Degree In Computer & Information Systems?

Computer and information technology occupations are projected to grow 12% from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all new occupations, as a result of an increased business focus on cloud computer, data collection and storage, and information security. The median annual salary for these occupations is over $86,000.*

Graduates of Champlain's online computer information and information systems degree program will be prepared to enter a variety of technical career paths across many fields and industries, including IT support, programming, application development, infrastructure architecture, and more. 

*Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 2019; job titles: Payscale, 2019

Top Jobs for Bachelor's in Computer & Information Systems Graduates

  • Application Developer
  • Business Systems Analyst
  • IT Systems Manager
  • Network Administrator
  • Programmer Analyst
  • Software Developer
  • Systems Analyst
  • Systems Engineer
Computer and information systems online graduate collaborating with colleague in computer lab

Program Details

Learn more about Champlain's 100% online computer and information systems bachelor's degree, designed for working professionals.

Champlain's online computer & information systems courses encompass the top skills needed by today's CIS professionals. Graduates of the program are required to complete the following courses.

Professional Courses (54 credits):

Technical Electives (12 credits)

General Education Courses (24 credits)

Math Electives (6 credits)

Science Literacy (4 credits)

Human Thought & Creative Expression (3 credits)

Human Behavior & Social Institutions (3 credits)

Historical Perspectives (3 credits)

General Electives (11 credits required)

Note: Some of the courses in this program are available in 15-week terms only. Please contact your advisor for details.   

Professional Courses:

This course provides students with an understanding of the many different devices and technologies, from historical to emerging, that are required to design and build networks. In a broad survey of concepts and terminology, students will learn about topology, communications, protocols, and security, and to diagram basic networks to specification.

From day one, students in this course are problem solving, first in terms of algorithmic design and then as early as week two via programming in the latest version of Python, using PyCharm. Students begin by writing a program to have a conversation, having strings and numbers as input, and advance, by week seven, to building a working password saver program, capable of looking up, adding (and encrypting), and storing passwords.

Students are presented with the opportunity to expand and showcase their knowledge and abilities in this 15-week course where they are expected to work independently and develop a project related to their major.

Prerequisites

Must complete 90 credits in major before taking this course.

In this course, students must use previously acquired and new, advanced skills in SQL (Structured Query Language) to modify an existing database to the needs of a client. Students write stored procedures and common table expressions, and learn to debug, rollback and use system stored procedures.

Prerequisites

CMIT-200

In the first of two capstone courses for the Management Information Systems (MIS) degree, students explore the role, types, and planning and development of MIS. Individual and team assignments reinforce learning of key concepts related to strategic initiatives and global trends, supply chain management, and innovative organizations and e-business initiatives.

Prerequisites

NETW-330, CMIT-310

In the second of two capstone courses for the Management Information Systems (MIS) degree, students design, plan, and develop a project that addresses a contemporary computer information system industry challenge and management problem. Students must consider people, processes and technology, including ethics and security, and present their proposals and solutions to the class and instructor.

Prerequisites

CMIT-410

Use Windows? Want to know more about Linux and or Apple? In this course, students don't just read about other operating systems, they step out of their comfort zones and develop a working knowledge of their structure and functionality. As part of these activities, students also learn how to use VMware and, in the case of students without access to Apple hardware, resources offered in the cloud as a services. Students also survey/compare mobile device operating systems.

This hands-on course will cover the fundamentals, of current Windows server systems and network administration. Topics will include the basics of installing the operating system, adding and managing users and groups, installing and managing services, Windows security objects and permissions, disaster recovery, and migration from previous versions of the operating system.

Prerequisites

CMIT-130, CMIT-140

A hands-on course covering key components of the Linux operating system. Through hands-on activities students will gain a working knowledge of the Linux operating system. Topics include installation and configuration of Linux, using common commands and graphical interfaces, installing common server applications, User and group account management, as well as performance monitoring and security systems.

Prerequisites

CMIT-130, CMIT-140

Examines the basic principles and methodologies used in the design of both local and wide area networks. Topics include network options, analysis, component and protocol selection, performance considerations and RFP development.

Prerequisites

NETW-250 or NETW-260

This course will introduce foundation subject matter and technologies that are critical to the multidisciplinary landscape of cybersecurity.

Prerequisites

Complete CMIT-130 and CMIT-135.

This course covers the fundamentals of systems analysis while emphasizing the role of communication and other soft skills needed in IT and in business overall to be successful. The topics are useful for anyone who is involved in developing software system requirements and architectures (e.g., users, technical managers, product managers, technical leads, programmers, other software project team members, and clients).

Prerequisites

CMIT-135, CMIT-200

This course is an introduction to programming using the Java programming language. Topics include programming logic, selection and repetition, array processing, classes, methods, and loops. The course introduces the student to the basic concepts of object oriented programming and exception handling. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems.

Prerequisites

CMIT-135

Learn the basics and more in this course on Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS) and SQL (Structured Query Language). Students propose a final project in the first module and then work, week-by-week, to design, create, and populate the database. Then, students learn to create queries and stored procedures.

Prerequisites

CMIT-135

From storyboard to form creation, students walk through the steps to create a basic four to five-page website to specification in this course that introduces HTML5 and CSS. Hands-on assignments reinforce skills development and best practices in design: navigation, column layout, image editing and usage, fonts and tables.

Students who want to build database-driven or interactive web sites benefit from this course which covers PHP and MySQL along with how to build sites that incorporate authentication and security. Each week hands-on assignments are used to reinforce concepts. Students advance from an introduction to PHP and basic syntax, to handling user input and manipulating arrays in web forms to queries.

Prerequisites

WEBD-125, CMIT-200

Websites have three functions - to facilitate, enable and persuade - and are only useful if they can connect people and achieve definite goals. In this course, students learn to understand the concept of usability, and the roles of interaction, users, communication and collaboration as well as how to evaluate usability, and observe and test users.

Prerequisites

WEBD-215 OR SDEV-230

Students will learn about the financial operations and analysis tools of any business or organization and their role in the success of the enterprise. Students will learn how to read and interpret financial statements and how to apply cost accounting theories and methods. They will gain a general knowledge about operational and capital budgeting processes and how to apply financial goals to departments and units and monitor financial performance against those goals.

Choose One

Organizations value project management skills for all employees because these skills make everyone more effective and efficient. You will be introduced to skills that define a project's scope, specifications and assumptions. You will also learn to develop a work breakdown structure and task plan, and to schedule and control the, project. These skills can be used immediately, in work and home life.

Project Management II introduces students to the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Standards and Behaviors. You will explore the body of knowledge that forms the foundation for the field of project management, and begin to develop the competencies required to be eligible for the PMP examination. You will also reinforce competencies learned in Project Management I and focus on processes used in professional projects, including skills needed to define a project's scope, create a project charter, develop a work breakdown structure, task plan, schedule, and controlling the work. Finally, the project you begin in MGMT-262 will be completed in MGMT-265, allowing enough time to develop a comprehensively managed project.

Choose One

This hands-on course will cover the fundamentals, of current Windows server systems and network administration. Topics will include the basics of installing the operating system, adding and managing users and groups, installing and managing services, Windows security objects and permissions, disaster recovery, and migration from previous versions of the operating system.

Prerequisites

CMIT-130, CMIT-140

A hands-on course covering key components of the Linux operating system. Through hands-on activities students will gain a working knowledge of the Linux operating system. Topics include installation and configuration of Linux, using common commands and graphical interfaces, installing common server applications, User and group account management, as well as performance monitoring and security systems.

Prerequisites

CMIT-130, CMIT-140

General Education Courses

This course draws on fundamental concepts of contemporary communication research to help students identify and develop strategies to become effective and versatile communicators across media and settings. Students will examine and respond to a range of interpersonal situations through the critical evaluation of the three essential components of all communication: its purpose, audience, and context. Students will leave the course with the ability to reflect on and adapt their strategies to successfully and consistently communicate for a range of purposes across diverse settings.

Students will learn to navigate the rapidly changing nature of communication in the digital age, deeply engaging with tools such as instant messaging, social networks, blogs and collaborative spaces online, all the while applying specific communication theories in order to determine best practices. Through reading, discussion and intensive hands-on projects, students will work to overcome online communication barriers and gain critical understanding of which tools are effective in which situations. Students will be required to download, access and utilize various online communication tools.

Prerequisites

COM-100 or COMM-130 and 30 completed credits or 60 completed credits

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts needed to communicate effectively in writing for academic study and professional development. Students will learn how to use the four stages of the writing process--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--to create written communication that meets its intended purpose for its intended audience. Students will also be introduced to rhetorical modes and their role in the development of written communication. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

This course builds on students' proficiency in the writing process and rhetorical modes to introduce the use of evidence from sources in written communication. Students will learn to determine the need for evidence from sources, identify types of information resources, develop effective search strategies, and incorporate evidence from sources in written communication legally and ethically. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

Prerequisites

Complete ENGL-100 with a minimum grade of C or better

This course will introduce students to major streams of social justice thought, including historical social justice movements, theoretical problems having to do with social equality, personal freedom, marginalization, and stigmatization, and the ways in which civic and professional communities respond to these issues.

Choose One

This course builds on students' proficiency in using evidence from sources to support their own prior knowledge to using evidence from sources to develop persuasive communication for a range of purposes, including solving problems and pursuing opportunities in the workplace, in addition to academic study. Students will learn to articulate effective inquiry questions, recognize errors in logic, interpret the validity of persuasive communication created by others, and develop effective persuasive communication of their own using evidence from sources. The role of accurate citation of sources in persuasive communication will also be addressed. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL-100 The Writing Process & ENGL-110 Introduction to Using Evidence from Sources in Writing.

Prerequisites

Complete ENGL-100 and ENGL-110 with a minimum grade of C.

In this course, adult students demonstrate skills and knowledge from work and other life experiences in order to request credit for a specified degree requirement. Students use the conceptual framework of argumentation to make a logical case for credit in an e-portfolio. The portfolio will identify the context for the student's learning in the subject matter, trace its progression over time, and explain how the learning is equivalent to the specified CCO degree requirement. The student will then demonstrate proficiency in each course learning outcome and integrate the learning outcomes in a relevant case study. To achieve a course pass, the completed portfolio must demonstrate course outcome proficiency according to the framework and criteria described above. Portfolios meeting these criteria will be submitted to a faculty subject matter expert for evaluation.

Prerequisites

Full admission into a CCO degree program, ENGL 111, ENGL 112, and approved PLA plan. Students within 12 credits of degree completion are not eligible to take CRIT 200.

Choose One

Specific application of common tools for writing in the working world. Students will be instructed in rhetorical strategies of professional writing including style, report formats, editing, document design, and integration of visual aids. Students will complete a semester-long writing project; oral and written reports associated with the process of problem-solving within the project will be included.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of technical writing (clear, concise, and targeted)that are common among seven forms of technical communication: email correspondence, editing,employment communication, proposals, long, formal reports,oral communication, and inventions. Through peer reviews and writing workshops, students develop the ability to write and edit text that precisely targets its audience. This course emphasizes deepening and broadening students' writing, speaking, and thinking abilities in a non-lecture-based, hands-on, discussion-centered classroom.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Choose One Science Literacy Course:

Introduces students to the biochemistry and physiology of nutrition and exercise. Emphasis will be placed on human body systems such as musculoskeletal, digestive, respiratory and circulatory, and their relationship to nutrition and fitness. Students will also study the biochemistry of energy conversion as it relates to exercise physiology. Laboratory sessions are designed to reinforce, by a hands-on approach, the principles discussed in lecture. Course includes two laboratory hours per week.

Students learn the biology, genetics, chemistry, and physics involved in the forensic investigation of crimes. A wide range of topics are studied including DNA, entomology, fingerprinting, trace evidence, serology (blood, saliva, and semen), blood spatter, and chemical analysis of drugs, alcohol, and other compounds. Students apply their new knowledge of forensic science through the use of case studies and laboratories. This course includes two laboratory hours per week.

Prerequisites

If you have taken FOR-110 you may not take this lab science course.

This lab course focuses on the structure and function of the human body and the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. This course includes: the study of human anatomical terminology and function, the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. It is recommended that students have a strong science background.

Prerequisites

Strong science background recommended

Choose One Human Thought & Creative Expression Course:

With pressure and release, a window opens and closes, recording light on a sensor. The simple action captures the instinct, judgement, and skill of the person behind the lens. This class will begin a study of the art and craft of photography. Students will develop their vision and their understanding of how to achieve it. Solid skills will be learned and many doors will be opened.

A survey of the continuing change experienced in art since the 15th century. Students will examine how an image is achieved as well as the significance of the subject represented. Individual inquiry concerning the nature of art is encouraged.

Students learn to appreciate films through the critical analysis of various elements of mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound. The course introduces the conventions of classical Hollywood cinema, considers the work of one major director (auteur), and surveys selected international and independent films. Students view and discuss films each week.

Students will become familiar with arguments originating from the following schools of ethics: virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism. Students will apply these ethical schools of thought to formulate arguments, practice deliberation and assess the implications of their decisions for various stakeholders in a professional context.

Prerequisites

Must have 75 completed credits or permission of Program Director.

A study of fiction of various lengths, with an emphasis on plot techniques, character development, style, point of view, setting, structure, theme, and artistic unity. Continued emphasis is placed on the improvement of writing skills.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 OR COR-125

An introduction to the major literary genres: poetry, drama and fiction. Selections are chosen from American, European and non-Western literature. The emphasis of this course is on improving the student's ability to read perceptively and write effectively . A continued emphasis is placed on the improvement of writing skills.

Prerequisites

ENG-110, ENGL-112 OR COR-125

Choose One Human Behavior & Social Interactions Course:

A survey of the science of psychology, including an overview of human behavior in various areas such as physiopsychology, development, learning social psychology, personality and abnormal behavior.

A study of human groups, culture, the self, and human interaction. The course focuses on contemporary American society and the influence of culture on our actions and beliefs, with the goal of fostering critical thinking about our social environment.

Historical Perspectives Course:

Students will study important themes in the social history of the United States since the Civil War. This course allows students to expand their critical thinking skills through an examination of primary and secondary sources. Themes might include: the evolving status of women; the immigrant experience; the concept of the American dream; the paradox of freedom vs. slavery; the minority experience; the tensions between social classes. Students will be evaluated primarily on writing assignments.

Prerequisites

HIST-211

Graduates of the computer & information systems bachelor's online program will acquire and demonstrate the following industry-specific skills, knowledge, and competencies:

  • Secure and administer network systems to ensure a stable enterprise information system environment.
  • Use scripting languages and web services to transfer data and add interactive components to web pages.
  • Identify and analyze user needs, and utilize them when selecting, creating, and evaluating computer-based information systems.
  • Design or improve enterprise-level information systems to meet business objectives.
  • Employ technical project management tools and techniques to complete tasks on time and budget.
  • Create and use database management systems to organize, store, and retrieve data.
  • Apply specialized knowledge to the development of a multi-functional information system.
  • Acquire in-demand technical, analytical and soft skills employers want - such as communication, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration - in general education courses that are a part of this degree.

Earn a specialized certificate in a concentration of your choice as you pursue your degree, so you can build credentials as you go.

  • CSS
  • HTML5
  • Java Programming
  • Linux Server
  • MySQL
  • PHP
  • PyCharm
  • Python
  • Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS)
  • SQL (Structured Query Language)
  • VMware
  • Windows Server

Champlain College Online's computer and information systems faculty, led by Cybersecurity Program Chair Kathleen Hyde, MCIS, MBA, are expert practitioners in the field. Their industry expertise ensures that our curriculum is aligned with the needs of employers, and reflects the skills today’s computer and information systems professionals need for success. Classes led by our seasoned experts will give you real-world insight into the world of information technology, and create a rich community of career-focused learning.

Alumni of the Champlain College Online bachelor's in computer and information systems program work in corporations, small businesses, government organizations, and nonprofits nationwide,  including:

  • Allscripts
  • Dealertrack Technologies
  • Federal Judiciary
  • Global Foundries
  • Heritage Automotive Group
  • IBM
  • ICF Macro
  • Keurig Dr. Pepper 
  • MetLife
  • National Security Agency (NSA)
  • Red Hat, Inc. 
  • SAIC 
  • State of Vermont
  • Zutano

Titles our alumni hold include:

  • Assistant IT Manager
  • Case Management/Electronic Case Files Administrator
  • Database Administrator
  • Field Services Engineer 
  • IT Coordinator
  • IT Specialist
  • Lead IT Specialist
  • Lead Systems Administrator
  • Network Engineer
  • Network & Information Systems Manager
  • Principal Technical Support Engineer
  • Staff Equipment Tech Engineer
  • System Administrator
  • Web Developer

Tuition & Costs

Continuing your education is an investment in your future. Learn more about our affordable tuition rates.

Dare to Expect More of Champlain Online

Expect Convenience

Our programs are designed for busy adults. Go to school wherever and whenever is best for you, on the device of your choice.

Expect A Career Focus

Everything you learn in our online classrooms is relevant and immediately applicable to your work.

Expect Support

Your education journey is our priority and our student support team has your back every step of the way.

Expect Superior Faculty

Learn from practitioner faculty working in the field, with real-world experience and knowledge.

Meet the Program Director

Kathleen Hyde, MCIS, MBA, Chair of Cybersecurity Programs, Champlain College Online faculty

Kathleen Hyde

MCIS MBA
Program Chair, Cybersecurity
  • Computer Forensics & Digital Investigations (B.S., Certificate)
  • Computer Information Systems (B.S.)
  • Information Security (M.S., Certificate)
  • Management Information Systems (B.S.)
  • Web Design & Development (A.S., B.S., Certificates)

About

Kathleen Hyde, MCIS, MBA, is the Chair of Cybersecurity Programs for Champlain College Online. She is responsible for the online cybersecurity and computer forensics and digital investigations undergraduate programs, as well as the M.S. in digital forensic science program.

As program director, Ms. Hyde maintains the cybersecurity and digital forensic programs' competitive and relevant edge, promotes the growth of the nation's cybersecurity workforce, and shares her passion for lifelong learning by teaching several online classes.

For more than 20 years, Ms. Hyde has provided consulting services in cybersecurity, data recovery, business continuity, and digital forensics to government, retail, finance, professional, and residential customers. She has also served as an instructor for Champlain's cybersecurity program and a subject-matter expert for course development for the past three years. Her areas of expertise and interest include insider threat detection, emerging threats and defenses, digital privacy and surveillance, and cybersecurity for educators.

Ms. Hyde holds both an MBA and an M.S. in Computer Information Studies from the University of Phoenix.

Why Champlain

Shane Dalziel, Bachelor's Degree in Computer & Information Systems

Flexibility

"I chose Champlain because it gave me the flexibility I needed. The accelerated format offers a great way to reach your goals faster, and makes earning your degree or certificate a realistic achievement that truly is obtainable."

Shane Dalziel Bachelor Degree in Computer & Information Systems
Director of Operations, VIP Media Co.

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